The NewsDemon Blog

Linux Kernel Turns 18 On USENET Newsgroup

By Newsgroup Usenet October 5th, 2009

linux-birthday-usenet

It might have been in late August 1991 that Linus Torvalds posted on the USENET newsgroup comp.os.minix about a new operating system he was developing, but it was October 5th, 1991 that Linux version 0.02, the official version of the kernel was announced and released.

Today, the Linux kernel celebrates its 19th birthday. In those nineteen years, Linux has seen an abundance of changes and improvements. As one of the first operating systems that relied on the online community to support it, it has been responsible for over 50 different versions since then.

Linus Torvalds was the originator of Linux and the initial leader of the community. As a USENET enthusiast and realizing the importance newsgroups had, he used the USENET as the first destination to announce the release of the first Linux kernel.

The open source Linux kernel was then improved upon by the USENET community as it still is today, alongside other online communities. In its now available 2.6.32-rc3 recent release, Linux demonstrates the innovation and improvement it has made throughout time due to its community contributed resources.

USENET itself celebrates its own 30th birthday this year as well. As a hub for online communities to share, develop and exchange, USENET has been an intricate part of the birth and the subsequent life that has made Linux available to this day as well as a host of other technologies in its time.



Celebrate USENET 30th Anniversary And Win!

By Newsgroup Usenet October 1st, 2009

askaquestion

So far, the online world has had a tremendous year. We’ve been introduced and have embraced a range of new technologies and a face lift of old favorites. It also marks the year in which the USENET, the first online social network outlet, celebrates it’s 30th Birthday.

In recognition of the tremendous resources, solutions and communities the USENET newsgroups put forth and continues to deliver over the last 30 years, NewsDemon.com Newsgroups will be hosting a series of events, including an interview with Tom Truscott, one of the founders of the USENET as well as other pioneers and entrepreneurs.

As the theme of USENET has been about bringing together online communities, we’re inviting you to be part of it.

Have you ever had a question about the USENET you thought that no one could answer? Did you ever wonder how a newsgroup or the USENET came to be? Now is your chance to find out.

As further incentive, we’re giving you the opportunity to win a free year of unlimited USENET access if your question is chosen by our panel of USENET experts.

Simply fill out our USENET Anniversary Questionnaire, and if you’re question is used in any of our interviews, we’ll give you a full year of USENET access.

We’ve set up a panel to review all submitted questions received by October 15th. NewsDemon.com Newsgroups will then use selected questions in our interviews. The user who submits the question that was best rated by our panel will then receive ONE FULL YEAR FREE OF UNLIMITED USENET ACCESS.  You may also submit multiple questions to be considered.

Hurry, as questions must be submitted by October 15th, 2009! You don’t have to be a member to enter and any current member that may win also qualifies.

Here’s your chance to find out all the answers to all your USENET questions and possibly win a free year of unlimited USENET access in the process!



Banned Books Week Announced On Newsgroups

By Newsgroup Usenet September 26th, 2009

banned-books-week

On many arts and literature newsgroups, the main topic of discussion this week is all about the ALA’s Banned Books Week. Banned Books Week (BBW) is an annual event which celebrates the freedom to read and the importance of the United States First Amendment.  Always held during the last week of September, BBW highlights the benefits of free and open access to information while drawing attention to the harms of censorship. This form and attempt of censorship is something very familiar as well with many newsgroups on USENET.

Launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, BBW was created primarily by bookstores and libraries, headed by The American Library Association.

More than a thousand books have been challenged since then.  People have challenged books that they say are too offensive for one reason or another: sex, violence, profanity, slang, racial or religion for the most part. Their targets range from books that explore the latest problems to classic and beloved works of American literature.

Some of the mainstream titles that have been banned are:

  • Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – Mark Twain
  • Forever – Judy Blume
  • The Catcher In The Rye – J.D. Salinger
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – J.K. Rowling
  • In The Night Kitchen – Maurice Sendak
  • Beloved – Toni Morrison

Others include: “To Kill a Mockingbird.” “Charlotte’s Web.” “The Sun Also Rises.” “As I Lay Dying.” “Kim.” “Winnie-the-Pooh.”

Over the years, groups and communities have taken it upon themselves to determine what books are worthy of being stacked on library shelves and what should be kept from the public. Many libraries and bookstores have answered back that access to such works, no matter what their content, is one of the precious traditions that should be defended.

In response, The American Library Association’s designated an annual Banned Books Week – now in its 28th year – to answer this cause. Many books challenged by communities as being inappropriate for public dissemination or that were targeted for banning have survived because of BBW as it brings librarians, teachers, booksellers and the media to rally and create public opposition to such moves.

Much like the freedoms of USENET, intellectual freedom, while not an explicit freedom guaranteed by the United States First Amendment, sits at the heart of our democracy; it is the freedom to access information and express ideas—even if the information and ideas might be considered unorthodox or unpopular.  Banned Books Week stresses the importance of ensuring the availability of unorthodox or unpopular viewpoints for all who wish to read and access them.

Banned Books Week (BBW) is an annual event which celebrates the freedom to read and the importance of the United States First Amendment. Always held during the last week of September, BBW highlights the benefits of free and open access to information while drawing attention to the harms of censorship. This form and attempt of censorship is something very familiar as well with many newsgroups on USENET.

Launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, BBW was created primarily by bookstores and libraries, headed by The American Library Association.

More than a thousand books have been challenged since then. People have challenged books that they say are too offensive for one reason or another: sex, violence, profanity, slang, racial or religion for the most part. Their targets range from books that explore the latest problems to classic and beloved works of American literature.

Some of the mainstream titles that have been banned are:

· Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – Mark Twain

· Forever – Judy Blume

· The Catcher In The Rye – J.D. Salinger

· Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – J.K. Rowling

· In The Night Kitchen – Maurice Sendak

· Beloved – Toni Morrison

Others include: “To Kill a Mockingbird.” “Charlotte’s Web.” “The Sun Also Rises.” “As I Lay Dying.” “Kim.” “Winnie-the-Pooh.”

Over the years, groups and communities have taken it upon themselves to determine what books are worthy of being stacked on library shelves and what should be kept from the public. Many libraries and bookstores have answered back that access to such works, no matter what their content, is one of the precious traditions that should be defended.

In response, The American Library Association’s designated an annual Banned Books Week – now in its 28th year – to answer this cause. Many books challenged by communities as being inappropriate for public dissemination or that were targeted for banning have survived because of BBW as it brings librarians, teachers, booksellers and the media to rally and create public opposition to such moves.

Much like the freedoms of USENET, intellectual freedom, while not an explicit freedom guaranteed by the United States First Amendment, sits at the heart of our democracy; it is the freedom to access information and express ideas—even if the information and ideas might be considered unorthodox or unpopular. Banned Books Week stresses the importance of ensuring the availability of unorthodox or unpopular viewpoints for all who wish to read and access them.



Newsgroup Spotlight: Environment and Ecology Newsgroups

By Newsgroup Usenet September 23rd, 2009

environment-newsgroups

Our global environment is currently facing obstacles that have a higher possibility than ever to seriously disrupt a sustainable future. For a time now, USENET has been home to a place where you can discover how to maintain or improve your quality of life while reducing your harmful impact on the earth.

Climate change is all over the news and it seems like everyone is “going green.” May are now taking action, too. Luckily, many of the steps we can take to stop climate change can make our lives better. With environment and ecology newsgroups, they help get the masses educated and get hooked on sustainability.

With many of these newsgroups, it has continues to unite people in an effort to make real and lasting changes in their communities that will protect the environment for years to come.

From energy related newsgroups to earth sciences, these newsgroups teach each other how to be responsible caretakers of the planet. Living green, through education and action.

Many of these newsgroups are based on discussions around research and science. The USENET newsgroups focuses on the challenges that climate change, resource degradation, and population growth pose for meeting human needs in the 21st century.

Because of it based on science and technology, they are able to often provide innovative solutions to problems that can make a sustainable future a reality.



Internet Hijacks 61st Emmy’s

By Newsgroup Usenet September 21st, 2009

emmys-newsgroups

Last night for the 61st Annual Emmy Awards, host Neil Patrick Harris did a skit as Dr. Horrible, his online blog persona, proclaiming the death of television and forecasting the future of internet entertainment. Didn’t that already happen 10 years ago?

Entertainment newsgroups postings discuss how Emmy host Harris made and showed a quick skit starring his character Doctor Horrible from Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog. The sketch guest-starred actor Nathan Fillion as Captain Hammer and a couple of other cast members from the online blog.

If you haven’t seen Neil Patrick Harris and his Dr. Horrible’s Sing Along Blog, it just won its own Emmy as an Outstanding Special Class: Short-format Live-Action Entertainment Program Emmy Award.

From Howser to Dr. Horrible, Neil Patrick Harris, who is also a cast member on “How I Met Your Mother,” opened up with a song begging viewers to stick with the show, and made several references throughout to the challenges facing broadcast television.

He earned kudos from critics, and from people appearing on the show. Harris successfully hosted the award show last year and was hoping for an even better show this year. He delivered.

Harris made a few good points that have been active considerations from TV broadcasters as more of its audience have been migrating online and away from the  TV tube.

Here in its entirety, is the clip from the awards show:



Microsoft Copies NewsDemon.com Newsgroups Student Discount Offer?

By Newsgroup Usenet September 18th, 2009

Student Discount Windows 7 Newsgroups

It appears that NewsDemon.com Newsgroups is not alone in trying to help out Students. In a Twitter posting last night, as well as postings on various Microsoft newsgroups, Microsoft stated that U.S. College students will be able to get the software license for a discounted $29.99.

It’s a good time to be a student, thanks in part to NewsDemon.com and a sweet Windows 7 discount from Microsoft.

Microsoft newsgroups points the deal to the win741.com site, a recently launched site from Microsoft.  The site proclaims: “For a limited time, eligible college students can get the sweetest deal on Windows 7 – for only $29.99 USD.  That’s less than most of your textbooks! Hurry — offer ends January 3, 2010 and 12 a.m. CST.” After that, it may go back up to $120 or Microsoft could extend the offer.  There are no set deadlines for the NewDemon.com offer.

Noting that to avail the offer students would require a valid college e-mail address, a Microsoft representative said: “This offer is specifically designed for those students who are not planning to purchase a new PC this year, but would still like to take advantage of what Windows 7 offers.”

Also, just like the NewsDemon.com Newsgroups Student Discount offer, to buy the student version of Windows 7 Home Premium customers need to provide a valid .edu e-mail address or an e-mail address from one of a number of listed educational institutions that do not provide .edu e-mail addresses. With the Microsoft offer, some customers may also have to provide current proof of enrollment.

On Wednesday of this week, NewsDemon.com Newsgroups had announced a similar approach, offering college and university students discount access to all subscription based plans. Two days later, Microsoft announces this new special. Coincidence?

This smart move clears as a path as Apple does have Microsoft beat on standard prices, with a copy of Home Premium (upgrade) retailing for $120 and $200 for a Professional upgrade (versus $29 for Snow Leopard).  With the price bar set nearly four times as high as Apple’s, the pressure is on Microsoft to deliver a dynamite product .

Microsoft Windows 7 is getting closer to its October 22 launch date.  With improved security, better compatibility, and a slick new look, the OS should please owners of both powerful and underpowered machines alike.

Microsoft also intends announcing similar offers in Canada, Australia, Mexico, Germany, France, and Korea, though at different prices.



Newsgroup Spotlight: Student Resource Newsgroups

By Newsgroup Usenet September 16th, 2009

education-newsgroups

An individual’s prosperity, happiness and impact on the future is mostly dictated by education in this day and age. Educating the minds of the young provide the future we hope to behold.

The importance of this has been a reminder during our efforts to give back to our community. With the free USENET access and our new Student discount offer, we hope to provide more with the resources USENET provides in continuing education.

From teachers and students alike, USENET newsgroups have been formed to contribute towards education through research and debate on current issues, structures and expectations at all levels of education.

Many new students throughout time have found that College newsgroups have provided them with a forum in which they have been able to formulate answers to expand their knowledge. Financial aid newsgroups to admission newsgroups have made many lives easier by taking out a lot of the guess work and generally being better prepared with moving forward with their educational path.

Whatever school a person may attend, many graduate school newsgroups exist to assist. Many of these newsgroups are filled with like minded individuals on either the same path or have the experience to help.

Education is a fundamental building block of a modern-day vision of success. With newsgroups dedicated to education as a tool, it can unlock volumes of knowledge to explore and discover.



Newsgroups Report Angry Weekend

By Newsgroup Usenet September 14th, 2009

angry-newsgroups

What do a Beyonce video, a Tennis match and the German National Democratic Party have in common? As many newsgroups are discussing, they’re all things that got people very angry this weekend.

To start off the weekend, German newsgroups began reporting riots that started first on Friday after scores of National Democratic Party (NPD) fans in Germany tried to sabotage a left wing party music festival in Hamburg. This led to an unauthorized demonstration on the Streets of Hanover that grew to thousands of people that took the street demanding a ban on the activities of the NDP. The demonstration turned out all wet as German riot police had to use water cannons to disperse rock throwing protesters in order to break the demonstration.

Serena Williams then caught the headlines of anger this weekend  after her outburst stemming from a foot fault that a line judge had given her towards the end of the US Open tennis match. She had cursed and screamed at the line judge, which then reported her to the other judges. Sport newsgroups report that having already received a conduct warning for throwing her racket in the first set, Williams was docked a point for her outburst. At 15-40, that was match point, and Serena lost the match – 6-4, 7-5 – without hitting another ball or shoving any down anyone’s throat.

Music newsgroups got the last surge last night as Kanye West made headlines for interrupting Taylor Swift’s acceptance speech at the MTV Music Awards. After Taylor Swift was announced for winning an award for her video, it motivated Kanye West to interrupt her speech to insinuate that Beyonce had a much better video. This is the third time that Kanye West’s anger has been caught by a live MTV event, which he probably believes he should win award for too.

On a positive note, new data recently released today by the FBI shows a drop of almost 4% of violent crimes throughout the US. The 3.9% percent decline in murder and manslaughter cases are part of nationwide drop in crime of about 1.7% from 2007-2008. The statistics were gathered by the FBI from local police reports. The report in the decrease in crimes was then posted on a variety of newsgroups related to both the FBI and US Government newsgroups.

So at least even with all the verbal anger, statistics provide a lesser chance of any of them getting violent.



Newsgroup Spotlight: Video Newsgroups

By Newsgroup Usenet September 10th, 2009

video-newsgroups

As online video channels such as YouTube, Hulu and a host of others gain popularity, so has the hobby of video production.

The YouTube slogan of “broadcast yourself” has been taken literally and seriously as more and more are finding creative ways to express themselves and communicate through video. USENET newsgroups themselves have been finding video a more popular medium for sharing content between users to illustrate topic points.

USENET newsgroups host a variety of different newsgroups that directly deal with video production. Video production newsgroups provide a medium for folks to communicate about the latest tricks and tips involved in creating those internet sensations we’ve grown to love.

Even professional video newsgroups are available for more advanced users that are looking more towards commercial cinematography and editing come to converse about the latest technologies and techniques used in larger productions.

Regardless, USENET newsgroups present a great resource to both average and advanced users alike. If you’re looking to find help or to create videos for on or off line, video newsgroups may be your answer. Providing in depth conversations and topics regarding producing, editing and distributing video, USENET newsgroups are the first channel you’ll want to try.



Discount USENET Access To All Educators And Students

By Newsgroup Usenet September 8th, 2009

education-newsgroups

NewsDemon.com Newsgroups is now offering discounted USENET access on all of its subscription based plans to all students and faculty that belong to a college or university.

It’s no surprise that education has a become a hot topic issue across the world. In response, NewsDemon.com is assisting by offering affordable access to that resources USENET provides to assist with higher learning.

More than 107,000 newsgroups are supported by NewsDemon.com Newsgroups. Many of these newsgroups provide large communities exist to share and discuss particular topics.

Newsgroup access provides educators and students a forum to cooperatively discuss ranging topics that newsgroups provide.

In order to qualify, you must have a “.edu” email address (example: [email protected]). After selecting your subscription based plan, enter in your .edu email address, submit, and the USENET access discount will automatically be applied.